Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK THIRD.--THE HOUSE IN THE RUE PLUMET CHAPTER VI THE BATTLE BEGUN


Author: Victor Hugo

Format: online reading

Category: Novel


Posted on 2007-05-13, updated at 2007-05-27. By anonymous.

Description

  • Author: Victor Hugo

Cosette in her shadow, like Marius in his, was all ready to take fire. Destiny, with its mysterious and fatal patience, slowly drew together these two beings, all charged and all languishing with the stormy electricity of passion, these two souls which were laden with love as two clouds are laden with lightning, and which were bound to overflow and mingle in a look like the clouds in a flash of fire.

The glance has been so much abused in love romances that it has finally fallen into disrepute. One hardly dares to say, nowadays, that two beings fell in love because they looked at each other. That is the way people do fall in love, nevertheless, and the only way. The rest is nothing, but the rest comes afterwards. Nothing is more real than these great shocks which two souls convey to each other by the exchange of that spark.

At that particular hour when Cosette unconsciously darted that glance which troubled Marius, Marius had no suspicion that he had also launched a look which disturbed Cosette.

He caused her the same good and the same evil.

She had been in the habit of seeing him for a long time, and she had scrutinized him as girls scrutinize and see, while looking elsewhere. Marius still considered Cosette ugly, when she had already begun to think Marius handsome. But as he paid no attention to her,the young man was nothing to her.

Still, she could not refrain from saying to herself that he had beautiful hair, beautiful eyes, handsome teeth, a charming tone of voice when she heard him conversing with his comrades, that he held himself badly when he walked, if you like, but with a grace that was all his own, that he did not appear to be at all stupid, that his whole person was noble, gentle, simple, proud, and that, in short, though he seemed to be poor, yet his air was fine.

On the day when their eyes met at last, and said to each other

those first, obscure, and ineffable things which the glance lisps, Cosette did not immediately understand. She returned thoughtfully to the house in the Rue de l'Ouest, where Jean Valjean, according to his custom, had come to spend six weeks. The next morning, on waking, she thought of that strange young man, so long indifferent and icy, who now seemed to pay attention to her, and it did not appear to her that this attention was the least in the world agreeable to her. She was, on the contrary, somewhat incensed at this handsome and disdainful individual. A substratum of war stirred within her.It struck her, and the idea caused her a wholly childish joy, that she was going to take her revenge at last.

Knowing that she was beautiful, she was thoroughly conscious, though in an indistinct fashion, that she possessed a weapon. Women play with their beauty as children do with a knife. They wound themselves.

The reader will recall Marius' hesitations, his palpitations, his terrors. He remained on his bench and did not approach. This vexed Cosette. One day, she said to Jean Valjean: "Father, let us stroll about a little in that direction." Seeing that Marius did not come to her, she went to him. In such cases, all women resemble Mahomet. And then, strange to say, the first symptom of true love in a young man is timidity; in a young girl it is boldness. This is surprising, and yet nothing is more simple. It is the two sexes tending to approach each other and assuming,each the other's qualities.

That day, Cosette's glance drove Marius beside himself, and Marius' glance set Cosette to trembling. Marius went away confident,and Cosette uneasy. From that day forth, they adored each other.

The first thing that Cosette felt was a confused and profound melancholy. It seemed to her that her soul had become black since the day before. She no longer recognized it. The whiteness of soul in young girls, which is composed of coldness and gayety, resembles snow. It melts in love, which is its sun.

Cosette did not know what love was. She had never heard the word uttered in its terrestrial sense. On the books of profane music which entered the convent, amour (love) was replaced by tambour (drum) or pandour. This created enigmas which exercised the imaginations of the big girls, such as: Ah, how delightful is the drum! or, Pity is not a pandour. But Cosette had left the convent too early to have occupied herself much with the "drum." Therefore, she did not know what name to give to what she now felt. Is any one the less ill because one does not know the name of one's malady?

She loved with all the more passion because she loved ignorantly. She did not know whether it was a good thing or a bad thing, useful or dangerous, eternal or temporary, allowable or prohibited; she loved. She would have been greatly astonished, had any one said to her: "You do not sleep? But that is forbidden! You do not eat? Why, that is very bad! You have oppressions and palpitations of the heart? That must not be! You blush and turn pale, when a certain being clad in black appears at the end of a certain green walk? But that is abominable!" She would not have understood, and she would have replied: "What fault is there of mine in a matter in which I have no power and of which I know nothing?"

It turned out that the love which presented itself was exactly suited to the state of her soul. It was a sort of admiration at a distance, a mute contemplation, the deification of a stranger. It was the apparition of youth to youth, the dream of nights become a reality yet remaining a dream, the longed-for phantom realized and made flesh at last, but having as yet, neither name, nor fault, nor spot, nor exigence, nor defect; in a word, the distant lover who lingered in the ideal, a chimaera with a form. Any nearer and more palpable meeting would have alarmed Cosette at this first stage, when she was still half immersed in the exaggerated mists of the cloister. She had all the fears of children and all the fears of nuns combined. The spirit of the convent, with which she had been permeated for the space of five years, was still in the process of slow evaporation from her person, and made everything tremble around her. In this situation he was not a lover, he was not even an admirer, he was a vision. She set herself to adoring Marius as something charming, luminous, and impossible.

As extreme innocence borders on extreme coquetry, she smiled at him with all frankness.

Every day, she looked forward to the hour for their walk with impatience, she found Marius there, she felt herself unspeakably happy,and thought in all sincerity that she was expressing her whole thought when she said to Jean Valjean:--

"What a delicious garden that Luxembourg is!"

Marius and Cosette were in the dark as to one another. They did not address each other, they did not salute each other, they did not know each other; they saw each other; and like stars of heaven which are separated by millions of leagues, they lived by gazing at each other.

It was thus that Cosette gradually became a woman and developed, beautiful and loving, with a consciousness of her beauty, and in ignorance of her love. She was a coquette to boot through her ignorance.


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More on This Book:
  1. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK FIRST.--A FEW PAGES OF HISTORY CHAPTER VI ENJOLRAS AND HIS LIEUTENANTS
  2. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK FIRST.--A FEW PAGES OF HISTORY CHAPTER V FACTS WHENCE HISTORY SPRINGS AND WHICH HISTORY IGNORES
  3. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK FIRST.--A FEW PAGES OF HISTORY CHAPTER IV CRACKS BENEATH THE FOUNDATION
  4. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK FIRST.--A FEW PAGES OF HISTORY CHAPTER III LOUIS PHILIPPE
  5. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK FIRST.--A FEW PAGES OF HISTORY CHAPTER II BADLY SEWED
  6. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK FIRST.--A FEW PAGES OF HISTORY CHAPTER I WELL CUT
  7. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK SECOND.--EPONINE CHAPTER IV AN APPARITION TO MARIUS
  8. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK SECOND.--EPONINE CHAPTER III APPARITION TO FATHER MABEUF
  9. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK SECOND.--EPONINE CHAPTER II EMBRYONIC FORMATION OF CRIMES IN THE INCUBATION OF PRISONS
  10. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK SECOND.--EPONINE CHAPTER I THE LARK'S MEADOW
  11. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK THIRD.--THE HOUSE IN THE RUE PLUMET CHAPTER VIII THE CHAIN-GANG
  12. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK THIRD.--THE HOUSE IN THE RUE PLUMET CHAPTER VII TO ONE SADNESS OPPOSE A SADNESS AND A HALF
  13. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK THIRD.--THE HOUSE IN THE RUE PLUMET CHAPTER IV CHANGE OF GATE
  14. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK FOURTH.--SUCCOR FROM BELOW MAY TURN OUT TO BE SUCCOR FROM ON HIGH CHAPTER II MOTHER PLUTARQUE FINDS NO DIFFICULTY IN EXPLAINING A PHENOMENON
  15. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK FOURTH.--SUCCOR FROM BELOW MAY TURN OUT TO BE SUCCOR FROM ON HIGH CHAPTER I A WOUND WITHOUT, HEALING WITHIN
  16. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK FIFTH.--THE END OF WHICH DOES NOT RESEMBLE THE BEGINNING CHAPTER VI OLD PEOPLE ARE MADE TO GO OUT OPPORTUNELY
  17. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK FIFTH.--THE END OF WHICH DOES NOT RESEMBLE THE BEGINNING CHAPTER IV A HEART BENEATH A STONE
  18. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK FIFTH.--THE END OF WHICH DOES NOT RESEMBLE THE BEGINNING CHAPTER III ENRICHED WITH COMMENTARIES BY TOUSSAINT
  19. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK FIFTH.--THE END OF WHICH DOES NOT RESEMBLE THE BEGINNING CHAPTER II COSETTE'S APPREHENSIONS
  20. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK FIFTH.--THE END OF WHICH DOES NOT RESEMBLE THE BEGINNING CHAPTER I SOLITUDE AND THE BARRACKS COMBINED
  21. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK SIXTH.--LITTLE GAVROCHE CHAPTER III THE VICISSITUDES OF FLIGHT
  22. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK SIXTH.--LITTLE GAVROCHE CHAPTER II IN WHICH LITTLE GAVROCHE EXTRACTS PROFIT FROM NAPOLEON THE GREAT
  23. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK SIXTH.--LITTLE GAVROCHE CHAPTER I THE MALICIOUS PLAYFULNESS OF THE WIND
  24. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK SEVENTH.--SLANG CHAPTER IV THE TWO DUTIES: TO WATCH AND TO HOPE
  25. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK SEVENTH.--SLANG CHAPTER III SLANG WHICH WEEPS AND SLANG WHICH LAUGHS
  26. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK SEVENTH.--SLANG CHAPTER II ROOTS
  27. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK SEVENTH.--SLANG CHAPTER I ORIGIN
  28. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK EIGHTH.--ENCHANTMENTS AND DESOLATIONS CHAPTER VII THE OLD HEART AND THE YOUNG HEART IN THE PRESENCE OF EACH OTHER
  29. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK EIGHTH.--ENCHANTMENTS AND DESOLATIONS CHAPTER VI MARIUS BECOMES PRACTICAL ONCE MORE TO THE EXTENT OF GIVING COSETTE HIS ADDRESS
  30. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK EIGHTH.--ENCHANTMENTS AND DESOLATIONS CHAPTER V THINGS OF THE NIGHT
  31. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK EIGHTH.--ENCHANTMENTS AND DESOLATIONS CHAPTER IV A CAB RUNS IN ENGLISH AND BARKS IN SLANG
  32. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK EIGHTH.--ENCHANTMENTS AND DESOLATIONS CHAPTER III THE BEGINNING OF SHADOW
  33. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK EIGHTH.--ENCHANTMENTS AND DESOLATIONS CHAPTER II THE BEWILDERMENT OF PERFECT HAPPINESS
  34. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK EIGHTH.--ENCHANTMENTS AND DESOLATIONS CHAPTER I FULL LIGHT
  35. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK NINTH.--WHITHER ARE THEY GOING CHAPTER III M. MABEUF
  36. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK NINTH.--WHITHER ARE THEY GOING CHAPTER II MARIUS
  37. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK NINTH.--WHITHER ARE THEY GOING CHAPTER I JEAN VALJEAN
  38. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK TENTH.--THE 5TH OF JUNE, 1832 CHAPTER V ORIGINALITY OF PARIS
  39. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK TENTH.--THE 5TH OF JUNE, 1832 CHAPTER IV THE EBULLITIONS OF FORMER DAYS
  40. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK TENTH.--THE 5TH OF JUNE, 1832 CHAPTER III A BURIAL; AN OCCASION TO BE BORN AGAIN
  41. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK TENTH.--THE 5TH OF JUNE, 1832 CHAPTER II THE ROOT OF THE MATTER
  42. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK TENTH.--THE 5TH OF JUNE, 1832 CHAPTER I THE SURFACE OF THE QUESTION
  43. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK ELEVENTH.--THE ATOM FRATERNIZES WITH THE HURRICANE CHAPTER VI RECRUITS
  44. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK ELEVENTH.--THE ATOM FRATERNIZES WITH THE HURRICANE CHAPTER V THE OLD MAN
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  47. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK ELEVENTH.--THE ATOM FRATERNIZES WITH THE HURRICANE CHAPTER II GAVROCHE ON THE MARCH
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  49. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK TWELFTH.--CORINTHE CHAPTER VIII MANY INTERROGATION POINTS WITH REGARD TO A CERTAIN LE CABUC WHOSE NAME MAY NOT HAVE BEEN LE CABUC
  50. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK TWELFTH.--CORINTHE CHAPTER VII THE MAN RECRUITED IN THE RUE DES BILLETTES
  51. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK TWELFTH.--CORINTHE CHAPTER VI WAITING
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  55. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK TWELFTH.--CORINTHE CHAPTER II PRELIMINARY GAYETIES
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