Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK THIRD.--THE HOUSE IN THE RUE PLUMET CHAPTER VII TO ONE SADNESS OPPOSE A SADNESS AND A HALF


Author: Victor Hugo

Format: online reading

Category: Novel


Posted on 2007-05-13, updated at 2007-05-27. By anonymous.

Description

  • Author: Victor Hugo

All situations have their instincts. Old and eternal Mother Nature warned Jean Valjean in a dim way of the presence of Marius. Jean Valjean shuddered to the very bottom of his soul. Jean Valjean saw nothing, knew nothing, and yet he scanned with obstinate attention,the darkness in which he walked, as though he felt on one side of him something in process of construction, and on the other, something which was crumbling away. Marius, also warned, and, in accordance with the deep law of God, by that same Mother Nature, did all he could to keep out of sight of "the father." Nevertheless, it came to pass that Jean Valjean sometimes espied him. Marius' manners were no longer in the least natural. He exhibited ambiguous prudence and awkward daring. He no longer came quite close to them as formerly. He seated himself at a distance and pretended to be reading;why did he pretend that? Formerly he had come in his old coat, now he wore his new one every day; Jean Valjean was not sure that he did not have his hair curled, his eyes were very queer, he wore gloves; in short, Jean Valjean cordially detested this young man.

Cosette allowed nothing to be divined. Without knowing just what was the matter with her she was convinced that there was something in it, and that it must be concealed.

There was a coincidence between the taste for the toilet which had recently come to Cosette, and the habit of new clothes developed by that stranger which was very repugnant to Jean Valjean. It might be accidental, no doubt, certainly, but it was a menacing accident.

He never opened his mouth to Cosette about this stranger. One day, however, he could not refrain from so doing, and, with that vague despair which suddenly casts the lead into the depths of its despair, he said to her: "What a very pedantic air that young man has!"

Cosette, but a year before only an indifferent little girl, would have replied: "Why, no, he is charming." Ten years later, with the love of Marius in her heart, she would have answered: "A pedant, and insufferable to the sight! You are right!"-- At the moment in life and the heart which she had then attained, she contented herself with replying, with supreme calmness: "That young man!"

As though she now beheld him for the first time in her life.

"How stupid I am!" thought Jean Valjean. "She had not noticed him. It is I who have pointed him out to her."

Oh, simplicity of the old! oh, the depth of children!

It is one of the laws of those fresh years of suffering and trouble, of those vivacious conflicts between a first love and the first obstacles, that the young girl does not allow herself to be caught in any trap whatever, and that the young man falls into every one. Jean Valjean had instituted an undeclared war against Marius, which Marius, with the sublime stupidity of his passion and his age, did not divine. Jean Valjean laid a host of ambushes for him; he changed his hour, he changed his bench, he forgot his handkerchief, he came alone to the Luxembourg; Marius dashed headlong into all these snares; and to all the interrogation marks planted by Jean Valjean in his pathway, he ingenuously answered "yes." But Cosette remained immured in her apparent unconcern and in her imperturbable tranquillity, so that Jean Valjean arrived at the following conclusion: "That ninny is madly in love with Cosette, but Cosette does not even know that he exists."

None the less did he bear in his heart a mournful tremor. The minute when Cosette would love might strike at any moment. Does not everything begin with indifference?

Only once did Cosette make a mistake and alarm him. He rose from his seat to depart, after a stay of three hours, and she said: "What, already?"

Jean Valjean had not discontinued his trips to the Luxembourg, as he did not wish to do anything out of the way, and as, above all things, he feared to arouse Cosette; but during the hours which were so sweet to the lovers, while Cosette was sending her smile to the intoxicated Marius, who perceived nothing else now, and who now saw nothing in all the world but an adored and radiant face, Jean Valjean was fixing on Marius flashing and terrible eyes. He, who had finally come to believe himself incapable of a malevolent feeling, experienced moments when Marius was present, in which he thought he was becoming savage and ferocious once more, and he felt the old depths of his soul, which had formerly contained so much wrath, opening once more and rising up against that young man. It almost seemed to him that unknown craters were forming in his bosom.

What! he was there, that creature! What was he there for? He came creeping about, smelling out, examining, trying! He came, saying: "Hey! Why not?" He came to prowl about his, Jean Valjean's, life! to prowl about his happiness, with the purpose of seizing it and bearing it away!

Jean Valjean added: "Yes, that's it! What is he in search of? An adventure! What does he want? A love affair! A love affair! And I? What! I have been first, the most wretched of men, and then the most unhappy, and I have traversed sixty years of life on my knees, I have suffered everything that man can suffer, I have grown old without having been young, I have lived without a family, without relatives, without friends, without life, without children, I have left my blood on every stone, on every bramble, on every mile-post, along every wall, I have been gentle, though others have been hard to me, and kind, although others have been malicious, I have become an honest man once more, in spite of everything, I have repented of the evil that I have done and have forgiven the evil that has been done to me, and at the moment when I receive my recompense, at the moment when it is all over, at the moment when I am just touching the goal, at the moment when I have what I desire, it is well, it is good, I have paid, I have earned it, all this is to take flight, all this will vanish, and I shall lose Cosette, and I shall lose my life, my joy, my soul, because it has pleased a great booby to come and lounge at the Luxembourg."

Then his eyes were filled with a sad and extraordinary gleam.

It was no longer a man gazing at a man; it was no longer an enemy surveying an enemy. It was a dog scanning a thief.

The reader knows the rest. Marius pursued his senseless course. One day he followed Cosette to the Rue de l'Ouest. Another day he spoke to the porter. The porter, on his side, spoke, and said to Jean Valjean: "Monsieur, who is that curious young man who is asking for you?" On the morrow Jean Valjean bestowed on Marius that glance which Marius at last perceived. A week later, Jean Valjean had taken his departure. He swore to himself that he would never again set foot either in the Luxembourg or in the Rue de l'Ouest. He returned to the Rue Plumet.

Cosette did not complain, she said nothing, she asked no questions, she did not seek to learn his reasons; she had already reached the point where she was afraid of being divined, and of betraying herself. Jean Valjean had no experience of these miseries, the only miseries which are charming and the only ones with which he was not acquainted; the consequence was that he did not understand the grave significance of Cosette's silence.

He merely noticed that she had grown sad, and he grew gloomy. On his side and on hers, inexperience had joined issue.

Once he made a trial. He asked Cosette:--

"Would you like to come to the Luxembourg?"

A ray illuminated Cosette's pale face.

"Yes," said she.

They went thither. Three months had elapsed. Marius no longer went there. Marius was not there.

On the following day, Jean Valjean asked Cosette again:--

"Would you like to come to the Luxembourg?"

She replied, sadly and gently:--

"No."

Jean Valjean was hurt by this sadness, and heart-broken at this gentleness.

What was going on in that mind which was so young and yet already so impenetrable? What was on its way there within? What was taking place in Cosette's soul? Sometimes, instead of going to bed, Jean Valjean remained seated on his pallet, with his head in his hands, and he passed whole nights asking himself: "What has Cosette in her mind?" and in thinking of the things that she might be thinking about.

Oh! at such moments, what mournful glances did he cast towards that cloister, that chaste peak, that abode of angels, that inaccessible glacier of virtue! How he contemplated, with despairing ecstasy, that convent garden, full of ignored flowers and cloistered virgins, where all perfumes and all souls mount straight to heaven! How he adored that Eden forever closed against him, whence he had voluntarily and madly emerged! How he regretted his abnegation and his folly in having brought Cosette back into the world, poor hero of sacrifice, seized and hurled to the earth by his very self-devotion! How he said to himself, "What have I done?"

However, nothing of all this was perceptible to Cosette. No ill-temper, no harshness. His face was always serene and kind. Jean Valjean's manners were more tender and more paternal than ever. If anything could have betrayed his lack of joy, it was his increased suavity.

On her side, Cosette languished. She suffered from the absence of Marius as she had rejoiced in his presence, peculiarly, without exactly being conscious of it. When Jean Valjean ceased to take her on their customary strolls, a feminine instinct murmured confusedly, at the bottom of her heart, that she must not seem to set store on the Luxembourg garden, and that if this proved to be a matter of indifference to her, her father would take her thither once more. But days, weeks, months, elapsed. Jean Valjean had tacitly accepted Cosette's tacit consent. She regretted it. It was too late. So Marius had disappeared; all was over. The day on which she returned to the Luxembourg, Marius was no longer there. What was to be done? Should she ever find him again? She felt an anguish at her heart, which nothing relieved, and which augmented every day; she nolonger knew whether it was winter or summer, whether it was raining or shining, whether the birds were singing, whether it was the season for dahlias or daisies, whether the Luxembourg was more charming than the Tuileries, whether the linen which the laundress brought home was starched too much or not enough, whether Toussaint had

done "her marketing" well or ill; and she remained dejected, absorbed, attentive to but a single thought, her eyes vague and staring as when one gazes by night at a black and fathomless spot where an apparition has vanished.

However, she did not allow Jean Valjean to perceive anything of this, except her pallor.

She still wore her sweet face for him.

This pallor sufficed but too thoroughly to trouble Jean Valjean. Sometimes he asked her:--

"What is the matter with you?"

She replied: "There is nothing the matter with me."

And after a silence, when she divined that he was sad also, she would add:--

"And you, father--is there anything wrong with you?"

"With me? Nothing," said he.

These two beings who had loved each other so exclusively, and with so touching an affection, and who had lived so long for each other now suffered side by side, each on the other's account; without acknowledging it to each other, without anger towards each other, and with a smile.


Sponsored High Speed Downloads
5551 dl's @ 2326 KB/s
Download Now [Full Version]
7312 dl's @ 3587 KB/s
Download Link 1 - Fast Download
8718 dl's @ 3950 KB/s
Download Mirror - Direct Download



More on This Book:
  1. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK FIRST.--A FEW PAGES OF HISTORY CHAPTER VI ENJOLRAS AND HIS LIEUTENANTS
  2. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK FIRST.--A FEW PAGES OF HISTORY CHAPTER V FACTS WHENCE HISTORY SPRINGS AND WHICH HISTORY IGNORES
  3. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK FIRST.--A FEW PAGES OF HISTORY CHAPTER IV CRACKS BENEATH THE FOUNDATION
  4. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK FIRST.--A FEW PAGES OF HISTORY CHAPTER III LOUIS PHILIPPE
  5. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK FIRST.--A FEW PAGES OF HISTORY CHAPTER II BADLY SEWED
  6. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK FIRST.--A FEW PAGES OF HISTORY CHAPTER I WELL CUT
  7. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK SECOND.--EPONINE CHAPTER IV AN APPARITION TO MARIUS
  8. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK SECOND.--EPONINE CHAPTER III APPARITION TO FATHER MABEUF
  9. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK SECOND.--EPONINE CHAPTER II EMBRYONIC FORMATION OF CRIMES IN THE INCUBATION OF PRISONS
  10. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK SECOND.--EPONINE CHAPTER I THE LARK'S MEADOW
  11. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK THIRD.--THE HOUSE IN THE RUE PLUMET CHAPTER VIII THE CHAIN-GANG
  12. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK THIRD.--THE HOUSE IN THE RUE PLUMET CHAPTER VI THE BATTLE BEGUN
  13. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK THIRD.--THE HOUSE IN THE RUE PLUMET CHAPTER IV CHANGE OF GATE
  14. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK FOURTH.--SUCCOR FROM BELOW MAY TURN OUT TO BE SUCCOR FROM ON HIGH CHAPTER II MOTHER PLUTARQUE FINDS NO DIFFICULTY IN EXPLAINING A PHENOMENON
  15. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK FOURTH.--SUCCOR FROM BELOW MAY TURN OUT TO BE SUCCOR FROM ON HIGH CHAPTER I A WOUND WITHOUT, HEALING WITHIN
  16. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK FIFTH.--THE END OF WHICH DOES NOT RESEMBLE THE BEGINNING CHAPTER VI OLD PEOPLE ARE MADE TO GO OUT OPPORTUNELY
  17. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK FIFTH.--THE END OF WHICH DOES NOT RESEMBLE THE BEGINNING CHAPTER IV A HEART BENEATH A STONE
  18. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK FIFTH.--THE END OF WHICH DOES NOT RESEMBLE THE BEGINNING CHAPTER III ENRICHED WITH COMMENTARIES BY TOUSSAINT
  19. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK FIFTH.--THE END OF WHICH DOES NOT RESEMBLE THE BEGINNING CHAPTER II COSETTE'S APPREHENSIONS
  20. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK FIFTH.--THE END OF WHICH DOES NOT RESEMBLE THE BEGINNING CHAPTER I SOLITUDE AND THE BARRACKS COMBINED
  21. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK SIXTH.--LITTLE GAVROCHE CHAPTER III THE VICISSITUDES OF FLIGHT
  22. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK SIXTH.--LITTLE GAVROCHE CHAPTER II IN WHICH LITTLE GAVROCHE EXTRACTS PROFIT FROM NAPOLEON THE GREAT
  23. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK SIXTH.--LITTLE GAVROCHE CHAPTER I THE MALICIOUS PLAYFULNESS OF THE WIND
  24. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK SEVENTH.--SLANG CHAPTER IV THE TWO DUTIES: TO WATCH AND TO HOPE
  25. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK SEVENTH.--SLANG CHAPTER III SLANG WHICH WEEPS AND SLANG WHICH LAUGHS
  26. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK SEVENTH.--SLANG CHAPTER II ROOTS
  27. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK SEVENTH.--SLANG CHAPTER I ORIGIN
  28. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK EIGHTH.--ENCHANTMENTS AND DESOLATIONS CHAPTER VII THE OLD HEART AND THE YOUNG HEART IN THE PRESENCE OF EACH OTHER
  29. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK EIGHTH.--ENCHANTMENTS AND DESOLATIONS CHAPTER VI MARIUS BECOMES PRACTICAL ONCE MORE TO THE EXTENT OF GIVING COSETTE HIS ADDRESS
  30. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK EIGHTH.--ENCHANTMENTS AND DESOLATIONS CHAPTER V THINGS OF THE NIGHT
  31. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK EIGHTH.--ENCHANTMENTS AND DESOLATIONS CHAPTER IV A CAB RUNS IN ENGLISH AND BARKS IN SLANG
  32. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK EIGHTH.--ENCHANTMENTS AND DESOLATIONS CHAPTER III THE BEGINNING OF SHADOW
  33. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK EIGHTH.--ENCHANTMENTS AND DESOLATIONS CHAPTER II THE BEWILDERMENT OF PERFECT HAPPINESS
  34. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK EIGHTH.--ENCHANTMENTS AND DESOLATIONS CHAPTER I FULL LIGHT
  35. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK NINTH.--WHITHER ARE THEY GOING CHAPTER III M. MABEUF
  36. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK NINTH.--WHITHER ARE THEY GOING CHAPTER II MARIUS
  37. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK NINTH.--WHITHER ARE THEY GOING CHAPTER I JEAN VALJEAN
  38. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK TENTH.--THE 5TH OF JUNE, 1832 CHAPTER V ORIGINALITY OF PARIS
  39. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK TENTH.--THE 5TH OF JUNE, 1832 CHAPTER IV THE EBULLITIONS OF FORMER DAYS
  40. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK TENTH.--THE 5TH OF JUNE, 1832 CHAPTER III A BURIAL; AN OCCASION TO BE BORN AGAIN
  41. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK TENTH.--THE 5TH OF JUNE, 1832 CHAPTER II THE ROOT OF THE MATTER
  42. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK TENTH.--THE 5TH OF JUNE, 1832 CHAPTER I THE SURFACE OF THE QUESTION
  43. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK ELEVENTH.--THE ATOM FRATERNIZES WITH THE HURRICANE CHAPTER VI RECRUITS
  44. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK ELEVENTH.--THE ATOM FRATERNIZES WITH THE HURRICANE CHAPTER V THE OLD MAN
  45. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK ELEVENTH.--THE ATOM FRATERNIZES WITH THE HURRICANE CHAPTER IV THE CHILD IS AMAZED AT THE OLD MAN
  46. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK ELEVENTH.--THE ATOM FRATERNIZES WITH THE HURRICANE CHAPTER III JUST INDIGNATION OF A HAIR-DRESSER
  47. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK ELEVENTH.--THE ATOM FRATERNIZES WITH THE HURRICANE CHAPTER II GAVROCHE ON THE MARCH
  48. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK ELEVENTH.--THE ATOM FRATERNIZES WITH THE HURRICANE CHAPTER I SOME EXPLANATIONS WITH REGARD TO THE ORIGIN OF GAVROCHE'S POETRY. THE INFLUENCE OF AN ACADEMICIAN ON THIS POETRY
  49. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK TWELFTH.--CORINTHE CHAPTER VIII MANY INTERROGATION POINTS WITH REGARD TO A CERTAIN LE CABUC WHOSE NAME MAY NOT HAVE BEEN LE CABUC
  50. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK TWELFTH.--CORINTHE CHAPTER VII THE MAN RECRUITED IN THE RUE DES BILLETTES
  51. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK TWELFTH.--CORINTHE CHAPTER VI WAITING
  52. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK TWELFTH.--CORINTHE CHAPTER V PREPARATIONS
  53. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK TWELFTH.--CORINTHE CHAPTER IV AN ATTEMPT TO CONSOLE THE WIDOW HUCHELOUP
  54. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK TWELFTH.--CORINTHE CHAPTER III NIGHT BEGINS TO DESCEND UPON GRANTAIRE
  55. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK TWELFTH.--CORINTHE CHAPTER II PRELIMINARY GAYETIES
  56. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK TWELFTH.--CORINTHE CHAPTER I HISTORY OF CORINTHE FROM ITS FOUNDATION
  57. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK THIRTEENTH.--MARIUS ENTERS THE SHADOW CHAPTER III THE EXTREME EDGE
  58. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK THIRTEENTH.--MARIUS ENTERS THE SHADOW CHAPTER II AN OWL'S VIEW OF PARIS
  59. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK THIRTEENTH.--MARIUS ENTERS THE SHADOW CHAPTER I FROM THE RUE PLUMET TO THE QUARTIER SAINT-DENIS
  60. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK FOURTEENTH.--THE GRANDEURS OF DESPAIR CHAPTER VII GAVROCHE AS A PROFOUND CALCULATOR OF DISTANCES
  61. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK FOURTEENTH.--THE GRANDEURS OF DESPAIR CHAPTER VI THE AGONY OF DEATH AFTER THE AGONY OF LIFE
  62. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK FOURTEENTH.--THE GRANDEURS OF DESPAIR CHAPTER V END OF THE VERSES OF JEAN PROUVAIRE
  63. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK FOURTEENTH.--THE GRANDEURS OF DESPAIR CHAPTER IV THE BARREL OF POWDER
  64. Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK FOURTEENTH.--THE GRANDEURS OF DESPAIR CHAPTER III GAVROCHE WOULD HAVE DONE BETTER TO ACCEPT ENJOLRAS' CARBINE

Search More...
Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK THIRD.--THE HOUSE IN THE RUE PLUMET CHAPTER VII TO ONE SADNESS OPPOSE A SADNESS AND A HALF

Search free ebooks in ebookee.com!


Links
Download this book

No active download links here?
Please check the description for download links if any or do a search to find alternative books.


Related Books

  1. Ebooks list page : 94
  2. 2007-05-13Les Miserables Volume 3 Marius, BOOK SECOND.--THE GREAT BOURGEOIS CHAPTER VII RULE: RECEIVE NO ONE EXCEPT IN THE EVENING
  3. 2007-05-13Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK THIRD.--THE HOUSE IN THE RUE PLUMET CHAPTER IV CHANGE OF GATE
  4. 2007-05-13Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK THIRD.--THE HOUSE IN THE RUE PLUMET CHAPTER VI THE BATTLE BEGUN
  5. 2007-05-13Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK THIRD.--THE HOUSE IN THE RUE PLUMET CHAPTER VIII THE CHAIN-GANG
  6. 2007-05-13Les Miserables Volume 3 Marius, BOOK THIRD.--THE GRANDFATHER AND THE GRANDSON CHAPTER I AN ANCIENT SALON
  7. 2007-05-13Les Miserables Volume 3 Marius, BOOK THIRD.--THE GRANDFATHER AND THE GRANDSON CHAPTER II ONE OF THE RED SPECTRES OF THAT EPOCH
  8. 2007-05-13Les Miserables Volume 3 Marius, BOOK THIRD.--THE GRANDFATHER AND THE GRANDSON CHAPTER III REQUIESCANT
  9. 2007-05-13Les Miserables Volume 3 Marius, BOOK THIRD.--THE GRANDFATHER AND THE GRANDSON CHAPTER IV END OF THE BRIGAND
  10. 2007-05-13Les Miserables Volume 3 Marius, BOOK THIRD.--THE GRANDFATHER AND THE GRANDSON CHAPTER V THE UTILITY OF GOING TO MASS, IN ORDER TO BECOME A REVOLUTIONIST
  11. 2007-05-13Les Miserables Volume 3 Marius, BOOK THIRD.--THE GRANDFATHER AND THE GRANDSON CHAPTER VI THE CONSEQUENCES OF HAVING MET A WARDEN
  12. 2007-05-13Les Miserables Volume 3 Marius, BOOK THIRD.--THE GRANDFATHER AND THE GRANDSON CHAPTER VII SOME PETTICOAT
  13. 2007-05-13Les Miserables Volume 3 Marius, BOOK THIRD.--THE GRANDFATHER AND THE GRANDSON CHAPTER VIII MARBLE AGAINST GRANITE
  14. 2007-05-14Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK FIFTEENTH.--THE RUE DE L'HOMME ARME CHAPTER I A DRINKER IS A BABBLER - Removed
  15. 2007-05-14Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK FIFTEENTH.--THE RUE DE L'HOMME ARME CHAPTER II THE STREET URCHIN AN ENEMY OF LIGHT
  16. 2007-05-14Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK FIFTEENTH.--THE RUE DE L'HOMME ARME CHAPTER III WHILE COSETTE AND TOUSSAINT ARE ASLEEP
  17. 2007-05-14Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK FIFTEENTH.--THE RUE DE L'HOMME ARME CHAPTER IV GAVROCHE'S EXCESS OF ZEAL - Removed
  18. 2007-05-13Les Miserables Volume 3 Marius, BOOK SECOND.--THE GREAT BOURGEOIS CHAPTER I NINETY YEARS AND THIRTY-TWO TEETH
  19. 2007-05-13Les Miserables Volume 3 Marius, BOOK SECOND.--THE GREAT BOURGEOIS CHAPTER II LIKE MASTER, LIKE HOUSE
  20. 2007-05-13Les Miserables Volume 3 Marius, BOOK SECOND.--THE GREAT BOURGEOIS CHAPTER III LUC-ESPRIT

Comments

No comments for "Les Miserables Volume 4 Marius, BOOK THIRD.--THE HOUSE IN THE RUE PLUMET CHAPTER VII TO ONE SADNESS OPPOSE A SADNESS AND A HALF".


    Add Your Comments
    1. Download links and password may be in the description section, read description carefully!
    2. Do a search to find mirrors if no download links or dead links.
    Back to Top